Index

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Introduction

The Encyclopedia of Electronic Music was created to help people get acquainted with the world of Electronic Music. It represents a database that keeps growing. The Encyclopedia of Electronic Music is the first and by far only source of information about serious non-academic Electronic Music artists on the web. This means that you will find here information about artists working in the domain of electronic prog: Classic Electronic, Cosmic, Berlin School, Rhythmic, Melodic, Ambient, Space and Experimental music. You won't find information about techno and new age artists here, so if you're looking for these - look elsewhere. There are plenty of sites about these genres.

Disclaimer 1: I never did, do not and will not have anything to do with any illegal music websites. If you see my name on any of such sites, you should know that it was used by another person without my permission.

Disclaimer 2: If a guy so-and-so ever made an album so-and-so, it will be in EEM. If the same guy decides to stop or use another name, he will remain in EEM. A note for musicians: please, don't send me letters asking me to delete you name from the database only because you stopped, don't like your name / nickname or simply want to alter / erase history. I will not and can't respond to it, as EEM is a source of information, and first and foremost it is a source of information on obscure, rare and vintage music. The truth is more important than ambition.

 

What genres are covered by EEM?

The genres that are covered by the Encyclopedia of Electronic Music are often referred to as "progressive electronic music" or "electronic progressive" (electronic prog).

Styles that are covered by the Encyclopedia of Electronic Music:

1) Progressive genres:

Electronic Progressive with all its subgenres:

Berlin School
Dusseldorf School
British School and other regional schools
Space Music
Classic Ambient
Progressive Experimental Electronic Music
World Music
Electronic New Age
New Berlin School
Electronic Kraut / Kosmische Musik

2) Semi-progressive genres:

Dark Ambient

3) Others:

Sometimes albums by artists that are not part of the progressive culture / scene are included in EEM. These albums must contain elements of progressive electronic music. Sometimes it happens that an artist working in one of the mentioned styles suddenly makes a purely Electronic Music album, or an EM track:

Progressive Rock
Academic electronics / Avant-Garde
DIY culture
Intelligent Techno
New Age
Contemporary Classical
Others
 

Styles that are NOT covered by the Encyclopedia of Electronic Music*:

Progressive:

Art Rock
Canterbury
Classical Progressive
Euro-Rock
Early Progressive
French Theatrical
Fusion
Gentle Giant style
Italian Progressive
Krautrock
Neo-Classical Progressive
Neo-Progressive
Oldfield style
Progressive Folk
Progressive Fusion
Progressive Space Fusion
RIO
Space Rock
Symphonic Rock
Zappa Music
Zeuhl

Academic:

Avant-Garde
Academic Electronics
Acousmatic Music
Collage Music
Computer Music
Contemporary Classical
Electroacoustic Music
Fluxus
Microtonal Music
Minimalism
Musique Concrete
Post-Modernism
Sound Poetry
Sound-Sculptures
Text-sound Composition
Others

DIY culture (including industrial, noise and post-industrial styles)

Aggrotech
Ambient Industrial
Classic Industrial
Coldwave
Dark Cabaret
Death Industrial
Electronic Body Music
Elektro
Experimental Music
Martial
Neo-Classical
Neofolk
Noise
Power Electronics
Power Noise
Others

Techno Culture / Club Culture

Acid Jazz
Ambient Techno
Breakbeat
Downtempo
Dub
Garage
Goa / Psychedelic
Hardcore
House
IDM
Jungle / D'n'B
Techno
Trance
Trip-Hop
Others

Popular / Mainstream

Disco
Dub
Electro
Electropop
Exotica
Funk
Glam Rock
Hip-Hop
Lounge
Pop Music
Psychedelic Rock
Rap
Reggae
Rock Music
Synth-Pop
Synthwave / Outrun electro, etc.
Others

Indie / Post-punk

Gothic Rock
Indie Rock
Minimal Electronics
Neue Deutsche Welle
New Romantics
New Wave
No Wave
Post-Punk
Post-Rock
Synth-Punk
Others

New Age

Meditation Music
Relaxation Music
Esoteric
Sounds of Nature
Background / Muzak / Passive Listening
Celtic
New Instrumental
Smooth Jazz
Others

Chiptune

Chiptune Music (Bitpop, Gamewave, Picopop etc.)


* To avoid confusion, this list only contains styles of music that may use similar instrumentation (synthesizers, samplers, computers, tape loops, processing) and techniques to those of progressive electronic music. There is also a plethora of styles that use primarily acoustic and / or electric instrumentation (classical, ethnic music, jazz, mainstream rock, heavy metal, grunge, religious music and so on) that cannot be covered in Encyclopedia of Electronic Music by default.

What kind of information is found in EEM?

The Encyclopedia of Electronic Music is intended to provide you with the following information about Electronic Music artists:

1. The name of the artist.

2. Country of origin.

3. A brief discography.

4. Description of the musical style and sometimes short reviews.

5. Related artists. 

Discographies

The discography of an artist contains all official releases, including limited editions, boxed sets etc.

CD EP's are generally indicated with an (EP) after the year of release.

All normal CD singles (if listed) and some mini-CD's / mini-LP's are indicated with an (S). The letter (S) usually means that the duration of a release does not exceed 30 minutes.

Note #1: An (S) after the year of release may indicate any release (except CD EP's), which is shorter in duration than normal CD / LP length. So the "S" in this particular case means "Small", not "Single".

However, some mini-LP's and mini-CD's (those exceeding the 30-minute mark) may not be indicated specifically.

For the vinyl era (S) means either a single or an SP (or EP) record, in contrast to a normal LP release.

The samplers of previously released material are NOT included, the only exception being when the sampler contains some previously unreleased tracks.

Boxed sets are included only if they contain new / unreleased material but are not indicated specifically.

Note #2: If an artist has only one or two electronic releases they will be listed in the discography. Other, non EM-related releases usually will NOT be listed, although in that case I usually mention in the reviews that there are some more albums from this particular artist.

To be included in EEM, a release should be on at least one of the following (physical) carriers:

1. Long playing vinyl record (LP)

2. 12" record

3. 10" record

4. 7" record

5. Other vinyl formats (single sided LP, flexi, vinyl EP, 78 rpm records, 45 rpm records, etc)

6. Compact Disc (CD)

7. Compact Disc Recordable (CDR)

8. Mini-CD

9. Cassette

10. 8-Track

11. Reel to reel tape 

12. Any other physical format 

Reviews

The reviews are my own opinion about the music and do not have to be the opinion of the majority. Usually I try to simply describe the musical style in the reviews so that the reader knows what to expect, with no emotional context. Ok, ok, I said "usually" :-)

 

Updates

The Encyclopedia of Electronic Music is constantly growing so always come back to check the recent updates. I really hope this Encyclopedia will be helpful for those interested in the wonderful and fascinating world of Electronic Music. Enjoy!

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5.07.2002 (revised in 2007, 2014 and 2016)

 

2002 - 2016. All materials in Encyclopedia of Electronic Music are protected by copyright law. Unauthorized copying and commercial exploitation is prohibited and subject to prosecution.